The South African Depression and Anxiety Group (Sadag) says suicide is not the answer to any problem, and help is available. There are 23 completed suicides in South Africa everyday, and a further 460 attempted suicides every 24 hours.

As part of World Suicide Prevention Day on Monday, Sadag aims to raise awareness about the warning signs of suicide, and debunk some myths associated with it.

Suicide can leave families and communities devastated, which is why people are encouraged to get help before it is too late.

Sadag Operations Director, Cassey Chambers, says people living with a mental illness experience stigma on a daily basis which makes it even harder to talk about.

“Sometimes, talking to someone and opening up that conversation to actually try and find out what they are thinking, how down they are, and what problems they are experiencing. But it also gives the opportunity for the other person to ask for help. Some other myth is that suicide is a very impulsive act and that it only affects people who have a lot of problems, and who are poor in rural areas. It is still taboo and a lot of shame put around suicide. So many families, especially in the African culture, do not talk about suicide. We need to do whatever we can to break those myths around suicide.”