The National Professional Teacher’s Organisation, Naptosa, has called on educators who are so-called “anti-vaxers” – or have doubts over the efficacy of the coronavirus vaccines to reconsider the vaccine’s safety.

The Johnson and Johnson vaccine has been proven to be highly effective against the coronavirus and is very safe.

The single-dose J and J vaccination programme for the education sector has been launched across the country.

It’s expected to last around two weeks.

Naptosa’s Executive Director, Basil Manuel, says they have tried to work with the 15% of people who were unsure of the vaccine.

“As far as the doubters are concerned – those who don’t want to take it – we have tried to work with the 15% from our survey that was sitting on the fence. We have had the statement from the department saying if you have comorbidity and have applied for a concession you are now being given the opportunity to be safe – can you expect the concession to continue? Now, of course, we will debate that but is it unreasonable? And honestly, I want to caution people not to cut off their noses to spite their faces. The question to ask is where am I safer – with or without the vaccine?”

The South African Teachers’ Union (SAOU) has also called on teachers not to be drawn into fake news about the coronavirus vaccine and to register to get vaccinated.

SAOU President Chris Kloppers says research shows that the vaccine does work.

Kloppers says, “We know that there’s a lot of conspiracy at this stage. We all need to join hands and reach herd immunity or otherwise, we are going to sit with this problem for years and we can’t afford that.”

“So our plea is to those who hear naysayers, please reconsider your decisions and take your jabs. I’ve already had my jab,” adds Kloppers.

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