The University of the Western Cape is celebrating the contribution of one of its physics students to the international world of nuclear physics.

Kenzo Abrahams name has been published alongside those of the world’s leading physics experts in a scientific journal in Switzerland.

Abrahams, from Kuils River, is a PhD student in nuclear physics, and has contributed to setting up a large array of detectors called Miniball.

His supervisor, Professor Nico Orce, says his achievement opens doors for students from poor backgrounds to excel in science on an international level.

Orce says the goal of the study is to discover why there is more matter than anti-matter in the universe.

Abrahams is an exchange student at CERN, the European Orgnisation for Nuclear Research in Switzerland.

“This new discovery, it’s about the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter you can see around us it’s so full of matter as the planet, the cars the building and the people but in principle this should not be happening there should have been the same amount of anti-matter which means that when they meet matter and anti-matter not only do they annihilate they just vanish all together so why we still have a planet that did not vanish it’s the question that physics cannot answer,” says Prof Orce.