The Greater Kokstad Municipality says more still needs to be done to restore the dignity and the heritage of South Africa’s indigenous people, especially the Khoisan and the Griquas.

The city of Kokstad in the southern part of KwaZulu-Natal is named after 19th century Griqua leader, Adam Kok the Third, who led his people to live in the previously uninhabited area.

The municipality will rename one of its buildings after Adam Kok and also unveil Kok’s statue during the Heritage Day celebration on Monday.

Municipal mayor Bheki Mtolo says he believe that this is the first step to help keep the culture of the indigenous people alive.

“I’m not going to say we are doing enough for the Griqua people or the Khoisan but we are not doing enough to keep the culture of the indigenous people in the for of Africans and Griqua and Khoisan. This project is the start we want to restore our dignity but also not do away with the history that also show that white people have s foot print in Kokstad. We are one nation we are diverse and we must show those features”.

Meanwhile Adam Kok’s descendants say they feel honoured that he will finally be given the honour he deserves.

Family Spokesperson Peter Samuels says he believes that this will help the Khoisan and the Griqua people realise their worth.

“This is an honour that we have long awaited for, that is bringing bestowed upon Adam Kok his life and his leadership in recognition of how he led his people out from the west Griqua land after he had been threatened with his life. He was forced to sign agreements with the British. He was forced to track a cross the Drakensberg mountain and into his Griqua land far western Griqua land and that all happened because of the discovery of diamonds on the land that he was occupying”.